Danae Peart

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At the time when I became the manager…I was the second woman of colour in the NCRA [National Campus and Community Radio Association]. And I was one of maybe a handful, as in no more than five people were mangers of stations across Canada‚Ķ. The impact of that is not necessarily having mentorship… not necessarily having a lot of people you can turn to, to guide you through this, navigate through this.”

— Danae Peart

Danae Peart’s work in the campus-community radio sector culminated in her position as station manager of CHRY (York University’s radio station, now known as Vibe 105). She points out subtle ways in which she noticed women were deterred from gaining on-air roles, such as being offered time slots that conflicted with child/family care or brought up safety concerns such as coming to the radio station late at night. She also acknowledges that women sometimes set limitations for themselves: “women have a perception that they can’t break in, so they don’t go hard because, they’re like, it’s a guy’s world.” She believes that women are treated differently than men in the radio industry but sees it as a reflection of society at large. Danae has since left the radio industry for a different career.

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